ePrivacy — the purpose




ePrivacy Regulation is essential in this digital era. It will not only clarify how we protect the confidentiality in the processing and transferring of data but also in the confidentiality of the data stored in end-users’ devices.

ePrivacy Regulation needs to be complementary to the solutions in the GDPR and the Code of Electronic Communications. However, it should be future-proof and pro-innovation.

Under clear conditions related to the GDPR provisions, we need to be open for further processing of data in order to meet public goals, such as in the area of #digalhealth. In the public debate, we confront the ePrivacy requirements and the needs of the Big Data economy development keeping in mind the balance between privacy, security and innovation.

The offer of privacy settings should be broad and easily understandable.

Under clear conditions, we need to create open possibilities for users to choose from, some of them related to many functionalities of the internet. The offer of privacy settings should be broad and easily understandable. In addition, it should be clear what kind of consequences individual decisions (consents) could have for the accessibility of different kinds of content. The choices given should be presented as clearly as possible and should reflect the logic of the system.

Users must have the choice to give their consent, but not in the zero-one model. With clear and non-discriminatory rules for all, under clear conditions, we should keep certain internet activities and business models ensuring the access to content as, for example, in the case of some local online media outlets, which base their business model on advertisements.

Users must have the choice to give their consent, but not in the zero-one model.

At present in all European Member States, we are implementing the GDPR. Besides the current application of the GDPR, we also need to be ready for the profound changes in ePrivacy. Thus, in our debates in the European Parliament and also later in the trilogue stage, we need to decide on the most appropriate terms for the entering ePrivacy into force.

We need to raise users’ awareness of the upcoming change. The use of ePrivacy solutions and mechanisms will probably be more difficult for some users. It will require new habits and attitudes, as well as some kind of digital literacy. We all need to have time to prepare for it.

Finally, it is obvious we need the ePrivacy Regulation, but more adjusted to the reality of us, as users and as citizens.